Critical Reasoning Week 1 Discussion

Please see the attachment

This is a graded discussion: 25 points possible due Jul 13 at 1:59am

Week 1 Discussion: Wisdom vs. Knowledge 27 31

Required Resources Read/review the following resources for this activity:

Introduction In 2012, Psychologist Heather Butler studied the importance that critical thinking plays in our everyday lives. “Critical thinking is not just the new buzzword in education. Critical thinking involves real outcomes that can be measured, predicted, and—perhaps for the negative life events—avoided” (Butler, 2012, p. 725).

In 2013, studies by Grossmann, Varnum, Kitayama, and Nisbett concluded that wise reasoning, rather than intelligence, was a predictor of well-being. In 2017, Dr. Butler and her colleagues, referencing the Grossmann study and based on their own research, determined that the ability to think critically was a better predictor of effective life decisions than was intelligence (Butler, Pentoney, & Bong, 2017).

Initial Post Instructions For the initial post, address the following:

Follow-Up Post Instructions Respond to at least two peers or one peer and the instructor. Further the dialogue by providing more information and clarification. Look at your peers’ definitions. Do you agree with them? If yes, why, if no, why not?

Textbook: Chapter 1, 2, 3 Lesson Minimum of 1 scholarly source (in addition to the textbook)

Do you agree that wisdom/critical thinking is a better predictor of well-being than intelligence? To answer, you will have to define what the following terms mean for you:

Reflect on what you read in the text this week. Think of the people you know.

Critical thinking Wisdom Intelligence Well-being

Are the good people smart? Are the smart people good? How do you define “good”? How do you define “smart”? Can we use our intelligence to become “good”? If yes, how? If no, why not?

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 1 of 24

Search entries or author

” Reply

Writing Requirements

Grading This activity will be graded using the Discussion Grading Rubric. Please review the following link:

Course Outcomes (CO): 1, 7

Due Date for Initial Post: By 11:59 p.m. MT on Wednesday Due Date for Follow-Up Posts: By 11:59 p.m. MT on Sunday

References

Butler,H.A. (2012, Sep/Oct). Halpern critical thinking assessment predicts real- world outcomes of critical thinking. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 26(5), 721-729. 10.1002/acp.2851

Butler, H.A., Pentoney, C., & Bong, M. P. (2017). Predicting real-world outcomes: Critical thinking ability is a better predictor of life decisions than intelligence. Thinking Skills and Creativity, 25, 38-46. https://www.umass.edu/preferen/You%20Must%20Read%20This/ThinkingSkills.pdf

Grossmann, I., Na, J., Varnum, M.E.W., Kitayama, S., & Nisbett, R.E. (2013). A route to well-being: intelligence versus wise reasoning. Journal of Experiential Psychology: General, 142(3), 944–953. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3594053

Minimum of 3 posts (1 initial & 2 follow-up) Minimum of 2 sources cited (assigned readings/online lessons and an outside source) APA format for in-text citations and list of references

Link (webpage): Discussion Guidelines

Unread # $ % Subscribe

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/97891)Sonja Sheffield (Instructor) Jun 22, 2020

!

Greetings Students,

An examined life or a reflective life. . . the question is, is there a difference or are they the same? John Dewey (1909), Edward Glaser (1941), and Richard Paul (1993), each have a definition of critical thinking

Top

!

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 2 of 24

Edited by Sonja Sheffield (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/97891) on Jul 7 at 4:46pm

” Reply &

or critical reasoning. Consider each definition below and consider which best defines critical thinking/reasoning to you. Think about how this exhibits an examined life and answer this question in your post.

1) “Active, persistent, and careful consideration of a belief or supposed form of knowledge in the light of the grounds which support and the further conclusions to which it tends” (Dewey, 1909, p. 9).

2) According to Glaser (1941, p.5) critical thinking is as follows: (1) An attitude of being disposed to consider. . .the problems and subjects that come within the range of one’s experience; (2) knowledge of the methods of logical inquiry and reasoning; and (3) some skill in applying those methods. Critical thinking calls for a persistent effort to examine any belief or supposed form of knowledge in the light of the evidence that supports it and the further conclusions to which it tends.

3) Critical thinking is that mode of thinking – about any subject, content or problem – in which the thinker improves the quality of his or her thinking by skillfully taking charge of the structures inherent in thinking and imposing intellectual standards upon them. (Paul, Fisher and Nosich, 1993, p. 4).

Just consider the following

“If textbooks used more critical thinking exercises, students would learn the material better.” What do you suppose are the best arguments for and against this claim? You don’t need to take a position on this but by responding to the discussion this week, think about how to develop the strongest arguments possible for both sides.

Think about what additional information would you need to investigate, to ground each side’s arguments and solid facts? What assumptions about learning and schooling would you consider to make each side’s argument as strong as possible?

These are questions one needs to ask throughout the course.

REMINDER:

You are only required to post an initial answer post and ONE follow-up post in each required discussion, each week.

Please make your TWO posts each week between Monday and Sunday. Your posts must occur on different days with the first post occurring by Wednesday. If there are extenuating circumstances, please communicate with your professor.

References:

Dewey, J. (1909). How we think. Retrieved from https://www.gutenberg.org/files/37423/37423-h/37423- h.html (https://www.gutenberg.org/files/37423/37423-h/37423-h.htm)

Facione, P. & Gittens, C. A. (2016). Thinking critically. 3 . Ed. Pearson:Boston, MA.rd

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 3 of 24

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/118358)Monica Hernandez (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/118358) Monday

” Reply &

!

Hello Professor and Class,

Critical thinking- The objective analysis and evaluation of an issue order form a judgement in known as critical thinking. ” The stronger our critical thinking skills and habits of mind, the greater our prospects for success, whatever the endeavor” (Facione pg 2). Having good critical thinking skills helps one comprehend our own abilities and put our knowledge to the test to become victorious.

Wisdom- The ability to use one’s knowledge and being wise is termed as wisdom.

Intelligence- The ability to acquire the apply knowledge one has learned and skills.

Well-being- A good satisfactory condition of existence characterized by health, happiness and welfare.

Intelligence is more the ability to acquire knowledge but critical thinking is analyzing and evaluating a problem step by step and being able to find a solution. According to the article 6 Critical Thinking Skills You Need to Master Now states “In fact, lacking such skills can truly make or break a person’s career, as the consequences of one’s inability to process and analyze information effectively can be massive” (Erstad 2018). Acquiring is not as important or compulsive as critical thinking in a perspective in the healthcare field. Critical thinking skills are more important and a better predictor in a society.

Good is something which is morally the right thing to do. Smart is known to be a vigorous strength in something. Sometimes good people are smart bu not all smart people are good.

References:

Erstad, W. (2018). 6 Critical Thinking Skills You Need to Master Now.

Facione, P. A., & Gittens, C. A. (2016). Think critically (3rd ed.). Boston: Pearson.

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/97891)Sonja Sheffield (Instructor) Yesterday

!

Monica, thank you for your post for this week.

Chapter 1 shows a model of Bloom’s taxonomy – they are the steps to mastery of any learning endeavor and the basic components of critical reasoning. They have recently been simplified and reordered as follows: • Remember • Understand • Apply

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 4 of 24

” Reply &

• Analyze • Evaluate • Create

How do you think Bloom’s steps will apply to you as you pursue your career in the healthcare professions? How do you see yourself creating (the top of Blooms) in your current or nursing profession? Explain.

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/154614)Jasmine Burgess (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/154614) Yesterday

” Reply &

!

Hi Monica,

I agree that intelligence and critical thinking are two difference characteristics that an individual may possess. I agree that intelligence is acquired knowledge and critical thinking is analyzing and evaluating a situation to help create a favorable outcome. You gave me a different perspective regarding good people being smart but not all smart people are good. I can see your point of view being that you defined being smart as having skill according to certain things. Thanks for sharing

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/143371)Chloe Williams (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/143371) Monday

!

Chloe Williams

Week 1 Discussion

I believe that critical/wisdom thinking and intelligence are both great predictors of well-being. For me, these terms mean:

Critical thinking- to think deeper into something, a situation, or an issue, etc.

Wisdom- to be very familiar in many things of life

Intelligence- to be book smart

Well-being- how a person carry themselves or how they are seen by others

These are my definition for those terms and what I think when speaking of those terms. I believe that all of

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 5 of 24

” Reply &

these terms are great predictors of a person’s well-being because the way we think, how much we know, how educated we are all defines our well-being and any decisions we make in life. “Success consists of making well-reasoned, reflective judgments to solve problems, and to make decisions effectively” (Facione, 2016). Good people are not always smart and smart people are not always good. When you’re too smart or know too much, that can be a good thing or bad thing. Unfortunately, smart people take advantage of being smart in a negative way. “Lacking skills can either make or break a persons career” (Erstad, 2018). Not only could lacking skills make or break a persons career, it can also make it easier for people to get taken advantage of if they do not know any better. I define “good” as someone who always does the right thing and make the right choices no matter what, even when no one is looking. I define smart as someone who knows something thoroughly from front to back pertaining to any subject; someone who knows their stuff. I believe that you can use your intelligence to become good by understanding and knowing what is right and what is good and what is wrong and putting right in right and wrong in wrong and the good with the good.

References

Erstad, W. (2018). 6 Critical Thinking Skills You Need to Master Now.

Facione, P. A., & Gittens, C. A. (2016). Think critically (3rd ed.). Boston: Pearson.

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/97891)Sonja Sheffield (Instructor) Yesterday

” Reply &

!

Chloe, thank you for your post for this week.

In looking at your definition of wisdom, “Wisdom- to be very familiar in many things of life,”, can you express exactly what that entails and why you wrote what you did? I am interested in understanding.

Chapter 1 shows a model of Bloom’s taxonomy – they are the steps to mastery of any learning endeavor and the basic components of critical reasoning. They have recently been simplified and reordered as follows: • Remember • Understand • Apply • Analyze • Evaluate • Create

How do you think Bloom’s steps will apply to you as you pursue your career in the healthcare professions? How do you see yourself creating (the top of Blooms) in your current or nursing profession? Explain.

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 6 of 24

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/154614)Jasmine Burgess (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/154614) Yesterday

” Reply &

!

“Critical thinking is the process of reasoned judgement” (Facione & Gittens, 2016). I believe that critical thinking and intelligence go hand-and-hand when predicting an individual’s well-being. When it comes to well-being, critical thinking can be used in situations that will prevent an individual from harm. According to Schub (2018), “critical thinking is a complex intellectual method that can be generally described as a course of purposeful, insightful judgment that involves the growth and efficient utilization of multiple aspects of understanding to interpret and evaluate a situation and arrive at an end”. An individual can maintain their well-being by using both critical thinking and intelligence, which will help them to thoroughly evaluate the situation they are in and come up with ways to overcome it.

Wisdom can also play a major role in the well-being of an individual because wisdom is obtained based upon individual experiences. Each individual experience is different and the lessons that are learned behind these experiences can be used in future instances. In my opinion, wisdom contributes to critical thinking because an individual can take prior experiences, evaluate them, and use this knowledge to help create a more favorable outcome in the future experience.

I believe that people in the world today who are good were taught to do good. Although I believe that an individual that does good was taught to do good as a child, I also believe that an individual can learn to do good as an adult based upon their intelligence. Someone who is good genuinely tries to do no harm to others and practices honesty. These individuals tend to make decisions that are sound and makes the most sense in the moment, and they tend to receive positive life outcomes from their decisions. Although I believe that being smart and being intelligent differ slightly, in regard to critical thinking, I believe that an individual who possess either characteristic, whether smart or intelligent, has greater well-being than an individual who does not possess these qualities at all.

Facione, P. & Gittens, C. A. (2016). Thinking Critically. 3rd. Ed. Pearson: Boston, MA.

Schub, E. R. B. (2018). Critical Thinking: Enhancing Critical Thinking Skills. CINAHL Nursing Guide.

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/97891)Sonja Sheffield (Instructor) Yesterday

!

Jasmine, thank you for your post for this week.

Great definition of critical thinking but remember, the question prompt is asking for your definition. Coming up with your own definition will make it much easier for you to carry the definition with you even after this course.

One of the guidelines for being a good person depend on many other factors, in both the secular and

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 7 of 24

” Reply &

religious worlds. However, goodness also requires a bit of self-reflection of oneself. In other words, introspection. Do you think critical thinking is intuitive? Explain.

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/129972)Brittany Varnes (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/129972) Yesterday

!

Hi Professor and Class,

According to Fradera (2019), intelligence is critical in helping individuals make sound decisions regarding finances and health. However, Fradera observes that this is not the case in every situation as people who are deemed intelligent make erroneous decisions (2019). According to Butler et al. (2017), intelligence is the ability of the brain to process abstract content, though much is required to make sound judgments. I understand the following terms as follows:

Critical thinking is understood as an assessment of facts to make informed decisions.

Wisdom relates to knowing when, how, and why to do things by employing intelligence.

Intelligence involves the application of knowledge to solve issues in life.

Well-being is understood as the state of existence, where an individual’s welfare is described as healthy or prosperous.

On whether good people are smart, my opinion is that good is subjective. What I perceive as good could be viewed differently by another person, hence the need for explanation. Nevertheless, good people can be smart if they apply critical thinking to make decisions. Good people can be perceived as smart or otherwise by the way they arrive at life decisions.

My take on whether smart people are good is that those we perceive to be smart are not always good. According to Fradera (2019), smart people tend to force their decisions down peoples’ throats since they deem themselves knowledgeable than others. Fradera also notes that smart people can lead to great losses when they err in decision making, especially when they hold places of leadership (2019).

“Good” and “Smart” are terms that are used to describe certain characters in individuals. According to Cohut (2018), when something or someone is described as “Good,” they possess likable attributes. On the other hand, individuals are described as “Smart” when they exhibit the ability to process information and utilize it in decision making.

I agree that we can use our intelligence to become “good.” To achieve this, we utilize the knowledge that we have gained over a lifetime and the experiences of our critical thinking to make sound judgments; the objective is to improve the well-being of others. This way, we use our intelligence to become “good.”

References

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 8 of 24

” Reply &

Fradera, A. (2019). Critical thinking skills are more important than IQ for making good decisions in life. Retrieved from https://digest.bps.org.uk/2017/07/21/why-some-smart-people-make-foolish-decisions/

Butler, H. B., Pentoney, C., & Bong, M. P. (2017). Predicting Real-World Outcomes: Critical Thinking Ability is a Better Predictor of Life Decisions than Intelligence. Retrieved from http://www.umass.edu/preference.pdf

Cohut, M. (2018). Being nice, or being smart: What leads to success? Retrieved from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321293#You-have-to-behave-smart

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/97891)Sonja Sheffield (Instructor) Yesterday

Edited by Sonja Sheffield (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/97891) on Jul 7 at 4:44pm

” Reply &

!

Brittany, thank you for your post for this week.

While you have provided good definitions of the terms indicated in the question prompt, remember, the question asks the following:

Do you agree that wisdom/critical thinking is a better predictor of well-being than intelligence? To answer, you will have to define what the following terms mean for you. It’s much better for you to come up with their own definition of these terms since it will be easier to carry with you throughout life and not have to focus on what someone else said or how they defined it. Can you try again please?

The same holds true for the definitions of smart and good as defined by someone else. Are you able to define those terms in your own words?

I would go one step further and posit that not only does intelligence help or lead to well-being but it also requires emotional intelligence for well-being. Emotional intelligence includes the ability to understand and regulate emotions; emotional well-being includes positive mood and high self-esteem. Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a key determinant of one’s success in life–even more so than Intelligence Quotient. What do you think?

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/148682)Ashley White (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/148682) Yesterday

!

Hi Professor and Class!

I think critical thinking and intelligence play a major role in well being. The following are what I think about

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 9 of 24

” Reply &

each term:

Critical thinking- the ability to take facts and information and reason appropriately to produce a productive response to an issue. Critical thinking is a collection of cognitive skills that allow us to think rationally in a goal-orientated fashion, and a disposition to use those skills when appropriate(Butler, 2018).

Wisdom- Using common sense and experiences when a person thinks or acts on something.

Intelligence- The ability to learn and then apply what you have learned.

Well-being- When you are emotional and physical healthy and happy.

Not all good people are smart and not all smart people are good. Critical thinking is very useful in ethical decision making, but like any tool or process, it can be applied to unworthy and shameful purposes as well(Facione, 2016). To me, good is defined as enjoyable, caring, fun to be around ect. Smart is defined as someone that can make good productive life choices based on what they know. I believe a person could use their intelligence to be good, but it depends on what type of person they are. It would depend on whether or not they had enough self awareness to realize they needed to become good as well.

Butler, H. (2018, January 12). Is it better to be intelligent or a critical thinker? Retrieved July 07, 2020, from https://geneticliteracyproject.org/2017/10/10/better-intelligent-critical-thinker/ (https://geneticliteracyproject.org/2017/10/10/better-intelligent-critical-thinker/)

Facione, P. & Gittens, C. A. (2016). Thinking critically. 3 . Ed. Pearson:Boston, MA.rd

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/97891)Sonja Sheffield (Instructor) Yesterday

Edited by Sonja Sheffield (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/97891) on Jul 7 at 4:36pm

” Reply &

!

Ashley, thank you for your post for this week.

Remember that the question is asking what do these terms mean to you; you have provided a definition from Butler, 2018. Can you take another go at defining and explaining what the terms mean to you and only you?

To your definition, there are two types of wisdoms, if you will – practical wisdom and theoretical wisdom. What’s the difference in your opinion?

I will absolutely agree that not all smart people are good and neither are good people smart. What separate them do you suppose? Can you think of someone that you know personally or that you have heard about that fits perhaps the smart but not good example?

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 10 of 24

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/115159)Jessica Woods (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/115159) Yesterday

” Reply &

!

Do you agree that wisdom/critical thinking is a better predictor of well-being than intelligence?

“Critical thinking is a collection of cognitive skills that allow us to think rationally in a goal-oriented fashion and a disposition to use those skills when appropriate.” (Butler, 2017). Wisdom/critical thinking is, in my opinion, a better predictor of well-being than intelligence. I believe wisdom and effective critical thinking comes from experience. An example of this would be a newly graduated surgeon vs a surgeon with 20 years of experience. Yes, the newly graduated surgeon has had to study and gain the intelligence needed to receive their degree, however, the only real experience they have is adding up clinical hours. They have always had someone by their side if they didn’t know what to do or how to work out an unforeseen problem. A surgeon with more experience has more than likely had to face a problem where thinking critically saved their patient’s life. You can be equipped with intelligence but must know how to use that intelligence in order for it to be effective.

Reflect on what you read in the text this week. Think of the people you know.

Not all good people are smart, and not all smart people are good. To determine what a good person is would be a question of ethics. In general, I define someone as good if they are honest, helpful, and polite among other things. In my opinion, being smart involves knowing how to critically think with the intelligence you possess. Intelligence is not necessary to be or become a good person. However, it is possible to use increased intelligence to provide a benefit to many people. “Strong critical thinking does not make a person automatically ethical or unethical. But critical thinking skills are valuable for decision making of all kinds.” (Facione, 2016).

Butler, H. A. (2017, October 03). Why do smart people do foolish things? Retrieved July 07, 2020, from https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-do-smart-people-do-foolish-things/ (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-do-smart-people-do-foolish-things/)

Facione, P. & Gittens, C. A. (2016). Thinking critically. 3 . Ed. Pearson: Boston, MA.

Are the good people smart? Are the smart people good? How do you define “good”? How do you define “smart”? Can we use our intelligence to become “good”? If yes, how? If no, why not?

rd

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/97891)Sonja Sheffield (Instructor) Yesterday

!

Jessica, thank you for your post for this week.

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 11 of 24

” Reply &

There is also a second part of the question (see initial prompts above) on the following:

Do you agree that wisdom/critical thinking is a better predictor of well-being than intelligence? To answer, you will have to define what the following terms mean for you:

Also, how do you define knowledge? Remember, this is your definition not that of anyone else’s. Please explain.

Critical thinking Wisdom Intelligence Well-being

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/115159)Jessica Woods (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/115159) Yesterday

” Reply &

!

Critical thinking – the ability to use wisdom, intelligence, and knowledge to make a decision or judgment Wisdom – knowledge that is gained through experience Intelligence – knowledge gained by learning that is applied Well-being – being mentally and/or physically comfortable or happy Knowledge – thoughts and ideals gained through study

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/97891)Sonja Sheffield (Instructor) 2:08pm

” Reply &

!

Thank you Jessica, for responding to the additional questions asked for this week.

Good definitions provided on your own. Don’t you think it’s better to come up with your own for future remembering?

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/131729)Loc Nguyen !

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 12 of 24

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/131729) Yesterday

” Reply &

Hello Professor and Class,

I do agree that wisdom/critical thinking is a better predictor of a well-being than intelligence. Strong critical thinking— making well-reasoned judgments about what to believe and what to do—is essential to consistently successful decision making (Facione, 2016, p. 6). One can have the intelligence, but without the experience over the years, one can trip themselves along the way.

Critical Thinking – the process of analysis before making a judgement.

Wisdom – acquired knowledge and experience to make good judgement.

Intelligence – collection of knowledge learn through studying.

Well-being – feeling good and comfortable.

Not all good people are smart, and not all smart people are good. I define good as someone with moral. To me smart is define as knowing when and where and how to act upon certain situation. We can use intelligence to become good directly or indirectly. The direct way is to help others around us and the indirect way is that a product was made because of intelligence, it could help the masses make their life better, or something like that. The ability to think, reason, and understand instead of doing things automatically or by instinct(Burton, 2018).

References

Facione, P. & Gittens, C. A. (2016). Thinking critically. 3 . Ed. Pearson:Boston, MA.

Burton, N. M.D. (2018). What is Intelligence? Psychology Today. Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/hide-and-seek/201811/what-is-intelligence (https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/hide-and-seek/201811/what-is-intelligence)

rd

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/97891)Sonja Sheffield (Instructor) Yesterday

!

Hello Loc, thank you for your post for this week’s discussion.

Can you think of anyone in particular perhaps in the news media today or even a few years ago who would fit the definition you have provided as being smart, but not good?

Also, there is more to be answered for this week. The other prompt you were to answer is as follows:

Do you agree that wisdom/critical thinking is a better predictor of well-being than intelligence? To

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 13 of 24

” Reply &

answer, you will have to define what the following terms mean for you:

Smart and knowledge are close. Smart was related to facts. Facts used to rule the world, if you could learn quickly this meant smart. If you could memorize words for a spelling bee for the definition and label all of the capitals of the US and other countries were smart. Times have changed. Smart has been devalued, smart cars and smart phones, etc., and smart planet. It no longer means what it used to mean. When you say someone is smart ends a conversation, it ends a conversation. Smart is just fast food now. Why even rank others anymore but rather embracing a growth mindset. What is smart and does it really matter?

Critical thinking Wisdom Intelligence Well-being

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/120562)Dianne Cruz (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/120562) Yesterday

!

I do agree that wisdom and critical thinking are better predictors when it comes to well- being. This is what I think the following words mean:

Good people are not always smart, and smart people are not always good. It definitely is possible to be good and smart. But you do not have to have one thing to have the other as well.

Smart is having or showing intelligence which is being able to apply the skills you have. Being good means being able to empathize with other people, to feel compassion for them, and to put their needs before your own. I believe not everyone is good but if they really try to they can change that. I believe being good is taught either as a child or as you grow older. I also do think we can use our intelligence to become good. One way to do that is by applying what you know about good people, how they act, how they treat others and incorporating that into your life.

Facione, P. & Gittens, C. A. (2016). Thinking critically. 3 . Ed. Pearson:Boston, MA.

Buckley, M. (2019, May 08). What Does It Mean to Be Smart? Retrieved July 07, 2020, from https://www.psychreg.org/what-does-it-mean-to-be-smart/

Critical Thinking: Evaluating and deeply thinking about an issue to be able to form a decision. Wisdom: Having experience and knowledge that you gather over the years. Intelligence: Being able to apply knowledge and skills known. Well-being: Being happy, comfortable and healthy.

rd

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 14 of 24

” Reply &

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/97891)Sonja Sheffield (Instructor) 2:25pm

” Reply &

!

Dianne, thank you for your post for this week.

Great definitions of critical thinking, knowledge, wisdom, and well being. I believe with those definitions of your own, you will be able to remember and recall them moving forward. Do you know of or have heard of someone who was smart but not good perhaps from the media?

Also, if someone were to ask you, friend or family, why are you taking a course in critical thinking or even why students need to take a course in Critical Thinking other than it is a requirement for coursework, how would you respond?

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/138709)Britney Parkerton (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/138709) 1:24am

!

Hello Professor and class,

I do believe that wisdom and critical thinking are better predictors of well-being than intelligence. While intelligence is an important component of well-being without critical thinking our intelligence would only get us so far in life. According to a scholarly written by Lisa and Mark Snyder (2008), “Merely having knowledge or information is not enough. To be effective in the workplace (and in their personal lives), students must be able to solve problems to make effective decisions; they must be able to think critically” (pg. 90). Critical thinking is essential to making well-rounded, thought out decisions in our lives. Without good critical thinking skills, we would continuously make poor decisions that would negatively affect our lives and others around us.

I would define critical thinking as putting pieces of information together to make good decisions. I would consider wisdom the information that we have learned throughout our lives that help us making decisions using critical thinking. Intelligence is the information we have learned through studying different subjects. Lastly, well- being is when we are comfortable and happy in life. I believe that all four of these terms are important in our overall lives, and critical thinking, wisdom, and intelligence all contribute to our well-being.

In our book Facione (2016) states, “A person can be strong at critical thinking, and be adept to using his or her critical thinking skills, but still not be an ethical thinker” (pg.25). In my opinion, good people are not always smart, just as smart people are not always good. I would attribute somebody being good by their morals and the way that they react to life situations. Therefore, being good is a characteristic that anybody can have no matter how smart they are. I believe it has to do with the type of person they are rather than how much

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 15 of 24

” Reply &

knowledge they have. On the other hand, I would say somebody that is smart has a high level of intelligence. A person that is smart does not have to be good, and there have been many instances in life where an intelligent person uses their knowledge to take advantage of people.

I do believe that we can use our intelligence to become good. While some people that may not have been good all their lives may struggle at first, I personally believe anything is possible. It is all about using the intelligence we have gained and applying it to our critical thinking to create solutions that will improve the well-being of others. This can be applied to all aspects of our lives whether it is in our personal or professional relationships.

References

Facione, P. & Gittens, C. A. (2016). Think Critically. Pearson Education, Inc. Retrieved from https://online.vitalsource.com/#/books/9780133914351/cfi/20!/4/2@100:0.00 (https://online.vitalsource.com/#/books/9780133914351/cfi/20!/4/2@100:0.00)

Snyder, L.G & Snyder, M.J. (2008). Teaching Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills. Retrieved from http://reforma.fen.uchile.cl/Papers/Teaching%20Critical%20Thinking%20Skills%20and%20problem%2 0solving%20skills%20-%20Gueldenzoph,%20Snyder.pdf (http://reforma.fen.uchile.cl/Papers/Teaching%20Critical%20Thinking%20Skills%20and%20problem%20solving%20s kills%20-%20Gueldenzoph,%20Snyder.pdf)

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/97891)Sonja Sheffield (Instructor) 2:20pm

” Reply &

!

Britney, thank you for your post for this week.

I like to think about what Socrates said, “The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.”

Good point on some individuals being smart but not using those smarts for good. Can you think of anyone specifically?

To tell a philosopher the value of thinking is to tell a cardiologist the value of a heart beating. Thinking is the link between ontology and epistemology: “What do I know, how do I know it, how am I sure I know it, and how does everything I know relate to everything else?” Literally, “lovers of wisdom” love to think.

But sometimes to students, it’s not that simple. They are often less aware of their thinking than they are aware of their heart beating; hence, awareness and motivation become vital. The goals and motivational introduction above, and the content and activities of this first chapter can help start all students towards thinking.

You may have heard the saying by Socrates, ” know thyself.” What are some ways that you might follow Socrates’ advice to “know yourself”?

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 16 of 24

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/144748)Boram Song (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/144748) 1:19pm

” Reply &

!

Hello Professor and class,

Critical thinking- The textbook gives an example, it is not a great idea to play poker if we cannot afford to lose(Facione, 2016). You need critical thinking to weigh all the good and bad possible outcomes, analyzing the issue at hand.

Wisdom vs. intelligence- Wisdom is being able to use experience and having good judgment, while intelligence is gaining and applying knowledge.

Well-being- Well-being can have many meanings, varying on the situation of each person. The best way to define well-being is to be comfortable, or happy.

I would have to agree that critical thinking/wisdom is a better predictor of well-being because you can have intelligence but not good judgment. There are many people with a college education and cannot think critically in the workforce.

Being smart to me can mean many things, being educated, or having experience in life. A smart person is able to apply that knowledge to resolve issues and assess situations. A good person is well-balanced and does not abuse their skills while harming others. In my life, I have good people, and they are smart, but I also have people who are just good. The definition of good is different based on the person, but overall being smart is being able to use the knowledge given/available.

Reference

Facione, P. & Gittens, C. A. (2016). Thinking Critically. 3rd Ed. Pearson: Boston, Ma.

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/97891)Sonja Sheffield (Instructor) 2:00pm

!

Boram, thank you for your post for this week.

I loved your examples and explanations of wisdom, knowledge, etc.

As we consider critical thinking or critical reasoning, in a career-changing world, the ability to think offers a stabilizing center: as specializations multiply, the life spans of those specializations shorten.

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 17 of 24

” Reply &

Employers value those people who can harness change and head it into the future. These are the people who can absorb information, process it, and produce it—in short, people who can think.

The process presented in this course will give you a system to understand your own thinking, to gather information, to create approaches, to organize your materials, to evaluate them, to problem solve, to make decisions, and to persuade others towards your positions. Thus, the skills gained in this course can be applied successfully to your careers and social life, making you a more successful individual.

Rarely do worthwhile things come easily. You have to work. In this course, the work is thinking. Thinking is work. (Have you ever been tired after taking a test or studying a few hours?) It is that type of work that will sharpen your mind.

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/155094)Jill Litwin (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/155094) 5:31pm

!

My definitions:

I think that wisdom and critical thinking are better at predicting well-being than intelligence because you can learn all the information you want from textbooks but you won’t be successful if you don’t know how to apply the information and use it to get ahead in life. According to our textbook, critical thinking is defined as “the process of purposeful, self-regulatory judgment” (Facione & Gittens, 2016). If you don’t have critical thinking skills then you will be making a lot of poor decisions that can have bad consequences for yourself and others. Your well-being will be affected by your decisions so it is important to have critical thinking skills and be able to analyze and determine what the best course of action to take it. You also need critical thinking skills to make good decisions and it was found that those with higher IQ were better able to make good decisions with critical thinking skills. A study was done that tested people on their experiences and decision making skills and measured their IQ. According to the British Psychological Society, “The avoidance of these kinds of experiences gives an indirect measure of wise, effective decision making, and the data showed higher IQ individuals did do better” (Fradera, 2017). The data showed that those with a higher IQ were more likely to make better decisions, but having critical thinking skills were more important that your IQ when making good choices. Wisdom is also important because you learn a lot through your experiences in life that you can’t

Critical thinking – the ability to decide what the best solution is for a problem based on what you believe is right vs. wrong. Wisdom – your knowledge based on your life experiences, achievements, and failures. Intelligence – knowledge based on learning information and being able to apply what you’ve learned and demonstrate skills. Well-being – your state of mind including being happy and healthy, including physically, mentally, and spiritually.

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 18 of 24

” Reply &

learn in a textbook. It involves making good judgements and using your knowledge, experiences, and common sense to make a decision. Elderly people are often referred to as wise because they have lived a long life and have a lot of experiences compared to younger people, so they are thought to know more about every day things.

References:

Facione, P. A., & Gittens, C. A. (2016). Think critically. Boston: Pearson.

Fradera, A. (2017, July 21). Critical thinking skills are more important than IQ for making good decisions in life. Retrieved July 08, 2020, from https://digest.bps.org.uk/2017/07/21/why-some-smart-people-make- foolish-decisions/

Are the good people smart? – you can be good but not necessarily be smart. For example, you can be uneducated and not know how to read or write but you can be a good person. You make sure to follow the laws, be nice to others, and be an upstanding citizen. Are the smart people good? – Smart people aren’t necessarily good. You can be very smart but be a con artist. For example, a wealthy person can be very smart and have went to college but is only wealthy because they use their intelligence to break the laws and commit fraud and launder money. You can be smart but be very rude to others, lie, cheat, and hurt people. Being smart does not equal being a good person. How do you define “good”? How do you define “smart”? – I think that being good refers to more of your personality and morality, while being smart refers to your intelligence. Being good is relative to the situation you are comparing. For example, you can be good at basketball against your friends, but compared to a professional athlete you are not good. Good can also mean you are a good person. I think being a good person means to do the right thing even when it is hard or no one is watching. Being smart just means you know a lot of information or know about a certain subject really well and knowing how to apply the knowledge for your advantage. Can we use our intelligence to become “good”? If yes, how? If no, why not? – I believe as people become more intelligent they tend to become a better person morally because they are highly educated. They are less likely to commit crimes or hurt other people because they are educated and know that doing that doesn’t solve anything. As you become more intelligent you will also become more aware of the issues around you, such as climate change, pollution, and human and animal rights. People tend to want to better their communities the more they know about certain issues. You will understand the impact we have on our planet if you are smart and know about issues. But you must be willing to want to change in order to be good. If someone doesn’t want to be a good person, no amount of intelligence will change that.

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/145323)Ashlyn Nichols !

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 19 of 24

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/145323) 7:36pm

” Reply &

Hello Everyone,

Critical thinking: is the process of in-depth thinking on a specific topic.

Wisdom: is information already learned and stored within the individual. Wisdom can be used throughout life.

Intelligence: is the process of applying knowledge to real life scenarios.

Well-being: how the individual views themself, based on the individuals lifestyle.

I personally think that wisdom/critical thinking is a better predictor of well-being than intelligence. Although I think critical thinking can solve both well-being and intelligence. Well-being can be established by health and happiness. Simply listening to the individual speak about their relationships with friends and family can pinpoint the their well-being. Health can also be viewed by your senses. For example, does the individual look obese? Does the individual keep up on their hygiene? etc. But, intelligence also can be predicted by having a conversation on a topic that both interest one another.

Some smart people aren’t good and some good people aren’t smart. I don’t believe it depends on the level of how good or bad someone is labels their intelligence. “Good has many dictionary definitions such as ‘Having desirable or positive qualities specially those suitable for a thing specified’ or ‘Deserving of esteem and respect”(Good or Bad). Overall I think good can be explained as actions or words that are established to benefit ones doings. Smart is similar to intelligence. Smart is an individuals knowledge on a topic they know very well. For example, everyone can be smart if they apply the knowledge they learned. Long term memory is where this information should be stored. Yes, you can use intelligence to become good. By taking the knowledge you’ve learned and applying it to do something good. For example, learning how to do a bed bath as a PCA, and then helping a coworker complete a bed bath with a patient. That is taking the information you learned then applying to an action that is good.

References:

Facione, P. & Gittens, C. A. (2016). Thinking critically. 3 . Ed. Pearson:Boston, MA.

Good or Bad. (n.d.). Retrieved July 08, 2020, from http://changingminds.org/explanations/decision/good_bad.htm

rd

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/64315)Dijana Rahmanovic (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/64315) 7:44pm

!

Critical thinking uses analyzation to determine our course of action. It is a “collection of cognitive skills that

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 20 of 24

” Reply &

allow us to think rationally in a goal-oriented fashion and a disposition to use those skills when appropriate.” (Butler, 2017).

Wisdom is often defined by the application of our experiences to our knowledge.

Intelligence is the capacity or us to hold logic.

Well-being is the state of being comfortable, healthy or happy.

I believe that wisdom and critical thinking are better predictors of well-being than intelligence is. Critical- thinking and wisdom can be looked at as “street smarts” while intelligence can be thought of as “book smart”. We all know that sitting through a lecture or reading an entire textbook can only take us so far with our education. Applying what we learn, using it in different scenarios and looking at it from different perspectives is what will really improve our expertise on it.

“Good’ as a character trait can be defined as having positive virtues (honesty, integrity, etc). Being “smart” means to have knowledge. These two characteristics are independent of each other and, therefore, anyone can be one or the other, neither of them or both of them at the same time. I believe we can use our intelligence to become both good and evil. Having a vast level of knowledge on different concepts and topics could make us more open-minded about the world, as we begin to understand multiple layers of issues. However, with more knowledge comes the possibility of taking advantage of it for personal gain.

REFERENCES

Facione, P. & Gittens, C. A. (2016). Thinking Critically. 3rd. Ed. Pearson: Boston, MA

Butler, H. A. (2017, October 03). Why do smart people do foolish things? Retrieved July 07, 2020, from https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-do-smart-people-do-foolish-things/ (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-do-smart-people-do-foolish-things/)

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/95642)Aliyah Castleberry (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/95642) 8:00pm

!

Professor and Class,

When presented with the question is wisdom and critical thinking a better predictor of well-being than intelligence, I would have to say that is it. To me, critical thinking is the ability to examine a situation, look at all of the facts, and act accordingly. At times people who are typically intelligent can lack the ability to critically think. Critical thinking allows us to problem solve. Personally, I think there are many people who are extremely intelligent and who are full of information, but lack the ability to problem solve and apply the knowledge that they do have. Wisdom on the other hand is derived from experience. Having wisdom allows us to look inside and truly examine ourselves and others, you could say it gives us insight. Well-being is

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 21 of 24

” Reply &

different from the rest of the terms used thus far. To me, well-being is a combination of a persons mental, emotional, physical, and spiritual self. Now, I know a lot of people don’t believe in any form of God or religion, but many of those people do believe that we as humans have spirits or energy. Therefore, I think it is still safe to use the word spiritual in regards to well-being. For a person to have a good well-being, it is important that they be balanced and feel happy or content with the life they are living and the person they are.

When reflecting on what I read in the text this week, I do not think that all good people are smart, but I also do not think that all bad people are not smart. This is a great time to point out that many people do things that they themselves believe to be good or that they did something for a just reason, but to an outsider looking in what they did could have been bad. Here’s a question I have, can we really define “smart”, or is the term smart subjective. Obviously, we have different standardized exams that we are required to take in order to achieve different things in life, but personally, I believe that the term “smart” is subjective. For example, if you were to combine a group of 100 different people from all walks of life and put them in a room and ask them to walk around and talk to one another, and then preform a survey at the end asking what they thought about the people they spoke to, I’m sure there would be many instances where 10 people thought John Doe was super smart, and another 10 who thought just the opposite. Next, I do not think that all “smart” people are good. There are many intelligent people who use their knowledge to harm and not help others. Now again, I truly believe that some of these terms are subjective. Good, bad, smart, and intelligent are terms that can be interpreted differently depending on where you are from and the culture or society you grew up in. Personally, I grew up in a Christian school surrounded by people who had Christian values, and because of this I tend to share a lot of the same values. Because of the values I have, I would define “good” as being morally just and doing no harm. Can we use our intelligence to become good… this is a hard question. I would like to think that someone could use their intelligence to become good, but at the end of the day I do not think that is possible. I think that people who are “good” can use their intelligence to become more “good”, but I do not think that “intelligent” people can use their intelligence to become good if they are not already somewhat good.

Thank you,

Aliyah Castleberry

References:

Facione, P. A., & Gittens, C. A. (2016). Think critically (3rd ed.). Boston: Pearson.

Ryan, S. (2013, February 04). Wisdom. Retrieved from https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/wisdom/

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/99157)Wei Wen Chiang !

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 22 of 24

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/99157) 8:35pm

” Reply &

According to the textbook, the expert consensus defined critical thinking as the process of purposeful, self- regulatory judgement (Facione & Gittens, 2016). I agree that critical thinking is a better predictor of well-being than intelligence. I think when I use my critical thinking, I actually think from all the angles instead of just one. The result will make more sense to majority of the people. In nursing, critical thinking is crucial because “critical thinking is necessary for nurses to assess patient needs and develop individualized interventions to promote optimal patient outcomes” (Johanns, B., Dinkens, A., & Moore, J. (2017).

Following are my definition for the terms:

Critical thinking – is a process that will take you to the end result in the most efficient way within the moral. Wisdom – some good ideas that passed down from the ancestors. Intelligence – an ability to think and learn. Well-being – holistically well

Are good people smart? No, I do not think so. Each person has their definition of good. For me, being good is when a person has a big heart and treats others kindly. Being smart is when a person can achieve the goal most of the time when others cannot. Good and smart does not have a certain correlation, but they can definitely coexist at the same time. Are smart people good? No, because people can use their intelligence on something that is totally immortal. For example: an accountant can use his/her intelligence to commit fraud, which is a crime in the society; therefore, smart people are not necessarily good. I believe we can definitely use our intelligence to become good and I believe everyone in this class is using it. We use our intelligence to learn and acquire about new skills and using the skills to save people’ lives, and for me, that is an excellent use of intelligence.

Reference: Facione, P. & Gittens, C. A. (2016). Thinking critically. 3 . Ed. Pearson:Boston, MA. Johanns, B., Dinkens, A., & Moore, J. (2017). A systematic review comparing open-book and closed-book examinations: Evaluating effects on development of critical thinking skills. Nursing Education in Practice, 27, 89-94. doi:10.1016/j.nepr.2017.08.018

rd

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/156890)Lynne Gallagher (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/156890) 9:52pm

!

According to do agree that wisdom and critical thinking are better predictors of well-being than intelligence. Critical thinking to me is a logical process to evaluate the best outcome. Wisdom to me is the collective knowledge of how to navigate situations through using past experiences, forethought and reasoning skills. I would define intelligence as the ability to store and recall knowledge and facts. Well-being to me would be

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 23 of 24

” Reply &

making good choices in life that leads to success or happiness for that individual person. I think that having the capability to use critical thinking and wisdom allows for a person to achieve well-being without continuously needing to suffer negative consequences in order to learn and grow as a person. Someone who possesses a lot of knowledge or facts does not automatically know how to apply them to real world situations, or they may understand how but lack the self awareness to do so. One article explained wisdom in this way, “The good judgment associated with wisdom is presaged oninsight into the self, others, and the world; integration of various aspects of personal recognition of life’s complexities and willingness to compromise; and the ability to transcendself-interests” (Wink & Staudinger, 2015).

Based on this weeks reading, I do not believe that all good people have high intelligence, however I do believe that good people do possess a certain amount of wisdom or critical thinking, they possess the ability to determine how to act in ways that are good for those around them by applying certain principles. And I do not believe that all intelligent people are good. Knowledge it self does not give you the ability to apply it correctly. For instance, knowing intellectually that drinking and driving is not smart does not mean that only people who do not possess this head knowledge are the only ones that do it. Facione & Gittens explains that in Step 5 of the critical thinking process we needs to “be deliberately mindful of our decisions and whether or not they are leading to our desired outcomes” (Facione & Gittens, 2016). One can be smart by completely side step this vital part in the critical reasoning process. I do believe that having the capability to gain knowledge or intelligence and the willingness to develop critical reasoning skills can assist a person to become “good”, or wise.

Facione, P. A., & Gittens, C. A. (2016). Solve Problems and Succeed in College. In Think critically(p. 57). Boston: Pearson.

Wink, P., & Staudinger, U. M. (2015). Wisdom and Psychosocial Functioning in Later Life. Journal of Personality,84(3), 306-318. doi:10.1111/jopy.12160

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/156890)Lynne Gallagher (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/65138/users/156890) 9:53pm

” Reply &

!

My copy and paste function has betrayed me. “According to” is not supposed to start the essay.

7/8/20, 10:02 PM Page 24 of 24

Examine Case Study: A Young Caucasian Girl With ADHDExamine Case Study: A Young Caucasian Girl With ADHD

College Essays Online:

Why Choose Us

College Research Papers

We offer professionally written research papers to our clients. We ensure all instructions are followed and that your custom paper is perfect. For a custom research paper, we have expert writers to help you. They will write your paper and earn you good grades

Professional Academic Writers

Are you looking for professional essay writers? Do you need custom paper writers to do your assignment? College essays online is packed with experienced writers who will handle your write my essay request. Order today to get quality services

Free Unlimited Revisions

Do you feel like your paper did not meet the requirements? Is there some instructions that have been skipped? Do not panic. Resubmit your essay for free and unlimited revisions. College essays online work to ensure our clients are satisfied.

Fast Delivery

Do you have an urgent essay and you don't know what to do? Do you have very little to do your assignments. Visit our online essay writing service for assistance. We have professional essay writers who will take your urgent paper. We have the best turn-around timein the market

Plagiarism-free Papers

If you are looking for a place to find original and plagiarism-free papers, visit collegessaysonline.com. We write your essay from scratch following your instructions. We ensure that every requirement is met, be it quality, delivery time, instructions etc.

24/7 Customer Support

If you have any concern or request, contact us anytime. We have a large team of customer support that are available 24/7. If it's a revision, send the revision file and any additional instructions and we will take care. Do not hesitate, Place an order with us today!

Our Services

Argumentative essay help

Are you looking for help with an argumentative essay? Do you have difficulties writing an argumentative essay? College essays online is here to help you. We will write a custom essay that meets your requirements. Do not feel overwhelmed, visit our cheap college essay website for professional academic writing help.

Reflection paper help

Do you need help with a reflection paper? Are you feeling challenged when writing a reflective essay? Are you looking for someone to write my reflection essay help? College essay writers have the answer to your problems. Submit your reflective paper assignment and let our paper writers do the difficult work.

Scholarship essay

If you are looking for someone to write an award winning scholarship essay, you landed at the right place. Our custom essay writers are professionals and have a 10 year experience. We will write a scholarship paper that will impress the scholarship committee. Hurry to get 25% discount.

Critical thinking essay

Are you looking for a critical analysis essay help? Do you need an online essay writing service to write your critical thinking essay? Visit our college essay website for help. We have professional essay writers who will develop a perfect critical essay for you.

Ethical research essay

Ethics is a prominent subject in many schools. Professors often ask students to reflect on a topic on ethics and write an essay. This requires a lot of research and knowledge. If you have been assigned an ethical research essay, contact essay writers at college essays online for assistance.

Narrative essay writing

A narrative essay requires a student to tell a story about something. It might be historical or a present narration. This type of essay follows certain rules and instructions. When you face challenges writing a narrative paper, visit our narrative essay writing service.

adana escort - escort eskişehir - mersin escortadana escort - escort eskişehir - mersin escort