**DEADLINE: FRIDAY 4/2/2021 BY 08:00 PM EST** INSTRUCTIONS: Respond to your colleague, by offering one or more additional mitigation strategies or further insight into your colleagues’ assessment of big data opportunities and risks. **At least 2 references per reply, and they need to support information in the reply** STELLA ADIMA Top of Form In our world today, technological innovation has become so fast grown and the world cannot do without them in terms of data collection and storage. Healthcare is one of the business fields with the highest big data potential. According to the prevailing definition, big data refers to the fact that data today is often too large and heterogeneous and changes too quickly to be stored, processed, and transformed into value by previous technologies (Stefan Rüping 2019a). The technological trends drive big data: business processes are more and more executed electronically; consumers produce more and more data themselves for example in nursing and in social networks and finally ever-increasing digitalization (Stefan Rüping 201b). Big Data also is a term used for the accumulation of information regarding the health-related data from an individual such as health history and current medical issues, diagnostics results. sociodemographic, lifestyle choices, etc. This information is compiled for a target population and can be used in such ways as clinical decision making, disease management, and preventative measures (Shanthagiri 2014). For this week’s discussion post, I am going to be talking about the benefits, challenges, and mitigation strategies for using big data in a clinical setting. When care givers are caring for patients, they must not only look at the current information rather the clinician/care giver has to look at specific detail of the patient’s current illness, health history, and cause of the disease that is being treated. One of the benefits of being able to use big data in a clinical setting is the ability to know these important details when making clinical decisions. For example, if a patient who is hypertensive and has been seeing the doctor regularly comes in to the clinic with an elevated blood pressure level, the ability to see the past data will allow the clinician to compare the data and map out the disease process. This would give the clinician the knowledge needed to form the best treatment plan (Laureate Education 2018). There are many benefits for using big data as well as challenges. One of the challenges centers around nursing terminology. The available data can be most effective when there is a standardized language among clinicians. The lack of standardized language within the collection and storage of data presents a problem when common data cannot be used by all disciplines. If the data are not easily translated to a vocabulary that can be used across disciplines the contribution of nursing information to patient outcomes cannot be measured (Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology 2017). The inability to collect, store, retrieve and/ or understand the data can lead to unsuccessful treatment for the patient. Another challenge in using big data in the clinical setting is the technological differences between facilities. It is very important that one system will or must be able to interface with another for the data to be retrieved. The inability to retrieve the appropriate information from the electronic health record leaves the clinician to treat only the current issue without knowing the past treatments or path of the disease. The strategies for mitigating the challenge of the language barriers in utilizing big data begin with learning more about the extent of the issue. The use of standardized nursing terminologies (SNT) would enable the data to be used by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians with a more positive outcome for patients (Macieirs, Smith, Davis, Yao, Wikie, Loez, & Keenan 2018). The proper storage and dissemination of big data in the electronic medical record (EHR) is another way to mitigate the challenges of using big data in a clinical setting. The integration of nursing datasets and the analysis of the information into an EHR that can be standardized for use between facilities would enable the clinician to retrieve the information and begin the appropriate treatment (Macieirs et al 2018). In conclusion, healthcare systems around the world are facing incredible challenges due to the ageing population and the related disability, and the increasing use of technologies and citizen’s expectations. Big Data can help healthcare providers meet these goals in unprecedented ways. The potential of Big Data in healthcare relies on the ability to detect patterns and to turn high volumes of data into actionable knowledge for precision medicine and decision makers. In several contexts, the use of Big Data in healthcare is already offering solutions for the improvement of patient care and the generation of value in healthcare organizations. This approach requires, however, that all the relevant stakeholders collaborate and adapt the design and performance of their systems. They must build the technological infrastructure to house and converge the massive volume of healthcare data, and to invest in the human capital to guide citizens into this new frontier of human health and well-being (Pastorino, R.; De Vito, C.; Migliara et al 2019) References Laureate Education (Producer). (2018). Health Informatics and Population Health: Analyzing Data for Clinical Success [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author. Macieira, T., Smith, M. B., Davis, N., Yao, Y., Wilkie, D. J., Lopez, K. D., & Keenan, G. (2018). Evidence of Progress in Making Nursing Practice Visible Using Standardized Nursing Data: A Systematic Review. AMIA … Annual Symposium proceedings. AMIA Symposium, 2017, 1205–1214. McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning. Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. (2017). Standard nursing terminologies: A landscape analysis. Retrieved 03/28/2021 from https://www.healthit.gov/sites/default/files/snt_final_05302017.pdf Pastorino, R.; De Vito, C.; Migliara, G.; Glocker, K.; Binenbaum, I.; Ricciardi, W.; Boccia, S. (2019). Benefits and challenges of Big Data in healthcare: an overview of the European initiatives. Retrieved on 03/29/2021 from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31738444/ Rutherford, M. A. (2008). Standardized nursing language: What does it mean for nursing practice? Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 13(1), 1–12. doi:10.3912/OJIN.Vol13No01PPT05 Shanthagiri, V. (2014). Big Data in Health Informatics [Video file]. Retrieved 03/28/2021 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4W6zGmH_pOw. Stefan Rüping (2015). Big data in medicine and healthcare. Retrieved on 03/29/2021 from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26063521/ Bottom of Form **DEADLINE: FRIDAY 4/2 /2021 BY 08:00 PM EST** INSTRUCTIONS: Respon d to y our colleague , by offering one or more additional mitigation strategies or further insight into your colleagues’ assessment of big data opportunities and risks. * * At le ast 2 references p er reply, and they need to support information in the reply ** STELLA ADIMA In our world today, technological innovation has become so fast grown and the world cannot do without them in terms of data collection and storage. Healthcare is one of the business fields with the highest big data potential. According to the prevailing d efinition, big data refers to the fact that data today is often too large and heterogeneous and changes too quickly to be stored, processed, and transformed into value by previous technologies (Stefan Rüping 2019a). The technological trends drive big data: business processes are more and more executed electronically; consumers produce more and more data themselves for example in nursing and in social networks and finally ever – increasing digitalization (Stefan Rüping 201b). Big Data also is a term used for t he accumulation of information regarding the health – related data from an individual such as health history and current medical issues, diagnostics results. sociodemographic, lifestyle choices, etc. This information is compiled for a target population and c an be used in such ways as clinical decision making, disease management, and preventative measures (Shanthagiri 2014). For this week’s discussion post, I am going to be talking about the benefits, challenges, and mitigation strategies for using big data in a clinical setting. When care givers are caring for patients, they must not only look at the current information rather the clinician/care giver has to look at specific detail of the patient’s current illness, health history, and cause of the disease th at is being treated. One of the benefits of being able to use big data in a clinical setting is the ability to know these important details when making clinical decisions. For example, if a patient who is hypertensive and has been seeing the doctor regular ly comes in to the clinic with an elevated blood pressure level, the ability to see the past data will allow the clinician to compare the data and map out the disease process. This would give the clinician the knowledge needed to form the best treatment pl an (Laureate Education 2018). There are many benefits for using big data as well as challenges. One of the challenges centers around nursing terminology. The available data can be most effective when there is a **DEADLINE: FRIDAY 4/2/2021 BY 08:00 PM EST** INSTRUCTIONS: Respond to your colleague, by offering one or more additional mitigation strategies or further insight into your colleagues’ assessment of big data opportunities and risks. **At least 2 references per reply, and they need to support information in the reply** STELLA ADIMA In our world today, technological innovation has become so fast grown and the world cannot do without them in terms of data collection and storage. Healthcare is one of the business fields with the highest big data potential. According to the prevailing definition, big data refers to the fact that data today is often too large and heterogeneous and changes too quickly to be stored, processed, and transformed into value by previous technologies (Stefan Rüping 2019a). The technological trends drive big data: business processes are more and more executed electronically; consumers produce more and more data themselves for example in nursing and in social networks and finally ever-increasing digitalization (Stefan Rüping 201b). Big Data also is a term used for the accumulation of information regarding the health- related data from an individual such as health history and current medical issues, diagnostics results. sociodemographic, lifestyle choices, etc. This information is compiled for a target population and can be used in such ways as clinical decision making, disease management, and preventative measures (Shanthagiri 2014). For this week’s discussion post, I am going to be talking about the benefits, challenges, and mitigation strategies for using big data in a clinical setting. When care givers are caring for patients, they must not only look at the current information rather the clinician/care giver has to look at specific detail of the patient’s current illness, health history, and cause of the disease that is being treated. One of the benefits of being able to use big data in a clinical setting is the ability to know these important details when making clinical decisions. For example, if a patient who is hypertensive and has been seeing the doctor regularly comes in to the clinic with an elevated blood pressure level, the ability to see the past data will allow the clinician to compare the data and map out the disease process. This would give the clinician the knowledge needed to form the best treatment plan (Laureate Education 2018). There are many benefits for using big data as well as challenges. One of the challenges centers around nursing terminology. The available data can be most effective when there is a

**THIS DISCUSSION IS DIVIDE IN TWO PARTS –

0. MAIN DISCUSSION POST BY TUESDAY 03/30/2021 BEFORE 8:00 PM EST

0. TWO REPLIES BY FRIDAY 04/02/2021 BEFORE 8:00 PM EST

Discussion: Big Data Risks and Rewards

When you wake in the morning, you may reach for your cell phone to reply to a few text or email messages that you missed overnight. On your drive to work, you may stop to refuel your car. Upon your arrival, you might swipe a key card at the door to gain entrance to the facility. And before finally reaching your workstation, you may stop by the cafeteria to purchase a coffee.

From the moment you wake, you are in fact a data-generation machine. Each use of your phone, every transaction you make using a debit or credit card, even your entrance to your place of work, creates data. It begs the question: How much data do you generate each day? Many studies have been conducted on this, and the numbers are staggering: Estimates suggest that nearly 1 million bytes of data are generated every second for every person on earth.

As the volume of data increases, information professionals have looked for ways to use big data—large, complex sets of data that require specialized approaches to use effectively. Big data has the potential for significant rewards—and significant risks—to healthcare. In this Discussion, you will consider these risks and rewards.

To Prepare:

· Review the Resources and reflect on the web article Big Data Means Big Potential, Challenges for Nurse Execs. – Please see attached article

· Reflect on your own experience with complex health information access and management and consider potential challenges and risks you may have experienced or observed.

Instructions

1. Post a description of at least one potential benefit of using big data as part of a clinical system and explain why. 2

2. Describe at least one potential challenge or risk of using big data as part of a clinical system and explain why.

3. Propose at least one strategy you have experienced, observed, or researched that may effectively mitigate the challenges or risks of using big data you described. Be specific and provide examples.

**At least 3 references** – one of them form the article for the resources.

**THIS DISCUSSION IS DIVIDE IN TWO PARTS

1.

MAIN DISCUSSION POST BY TUESDAY 03/

30

/2021 BEFORE 8:00 PM

EST

2.

TWO REPLIES BY FRIDAY

04/02

/2021 BEFORE 8:00 PM EST

Discussion: Big Data Risks and Rewards

When you wake in the morning, you may reach for your cell phone to reply to a few text

or email messages that you missed overnight. On your drive to work, you may stop to

refuel your car. Upon your

arrival, you might swipe a key card at the door to gain

entrance to the facility. And before finally reaching your workstation, you may stop by

the cafeteria to purchase a coffee.

From the moment you wake, you are in fact a data

generation machine. Each us

e of

your phone, every transaction you make using a debit or credit card, even your entrance

to your place of work, creates data. It begs the question: How much data do you

generate each day? Many studies have been conducted on this, and the numbers are

st

aggering: Estimates suggest that nearly 1 million bytes of data are generated every

second for every person on earth.

As the volume of data increases, information professionals have looked for ways to use

big data

large, complex sets of data that require s

pecialized approaches to use

effectively. Big data has the potential for significant rewards

and significant risks

to

healthcare. In this Discussion, you will consider these risks and rewards.

To Prepare:

·

Review the Resources and reflect on the web article

Big Data Means Big

Potential, Challenges for Nurse Execs

.

Please

see

attached

a

rticle

·

Reflect on your own experience with complex health information access and

management and consider potential challenges and risks you may have

experienced or observed.

Instructions

1.

Post a

descripti

on of at least one potential benefit of using big data as part of a

clinical system and explain why.

2

2.

D

escribe at least one potential challenge or risk of using big data as part of a

clinical system and explain why.

3.

Propose at least one strategy you h

ave experienced, observed, or researched

that may effectively mitigate the challenges or risks of using big data you

described.

Be specific and provide examples

.

**

At

least

3 references

**

one of them form

the

article for

the

resources

.

**THIS DISCUSSION IS DIVIDE IN TWO PARTS –

1. MAIN DISCUSSION POST BY TUESDAY 03/30/2021 BEFORE 8:00 PM

EST

2. TWO REPLIES BY FRIDAY 04/02/2021 BEFORE 8:00 PM EST

Discussion: Big Data Risks and Rewards

When you wake in the morning, you may reach for your cell phone to reply to a few text

or email messages that you missed overnight. On your drive to work, you may stop to

refuel your car. Upon your arrival, you might swipe a key card at the door to gain

entrance to the facility. And before finally reaching your workstation, you may stop by

the cafeteria to purchase a coffee.

From the moment you wake, you are in fact a data-generation machine. Each use of

your phone, every transaction you make using a debit or credit card, even your entrance

to your place of work, creates data. It begs the question: How much data do you

generate each day? Many studies have been conducted on this, and the numbers are

staggering: Estimates suggest that nearly 1 million bytes of data are generated every

second for every person on earth.

As the volume of data increases, information professionals have looked for ways to use

big data—large, complex sets of data that require specialized approaches to use

effectively. Big data has the potential for significant rewards—and significant risks—to

healthcare. In this Discussion, you will consider these risks and rewards.

To Prepare:

 Review the Resources and reflect on the web article Big Data Means Big

Potential, Challenges for Nurse Execs. – Please see attached article

 Reflect on your own experience with complex health information access and

management and consider potential challenges and risks you may have

experienced or observed.

Instructions

1. Post a description of at least one potential benefit of using big data as part of a

clinical system and explain why. 2

2. Describe at least one potential challenge or risk of using big data as part of a

clinical system and explain why.

3. Propose at least one strategy you have experienced, observed, or researched

that may effectively mitigate the challenges or risks of using big data you

described. Be specific and provide examples.

**At least 3 references** – one of them form the article for the resources.

NUR-621 Health Care Reimbursement Training Plan